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Can you walk off Erectile dysfunction?

October 23, 2013 by  
Filed under Diabetes, Libido

Researchers writing in the medical journal Urology examined questionnaires returned by over 15,000 aging men and found that moderate or severe sexual symptoms occurred in 20% of men 40 to 44 years and that significant symptoms increased with age up to 67% in the men 65 to 69 years. 1

Other researchers writing in The Journal of Sexual Medicine examined sexual function in older adults and noted that 41% of the men were sexually active with an average age between 75 and 87 (yes that says 87). The men who were not sexual active reported erectile dysfunction as the main reason why. Regardless the researchers concluded that desire for sexual activity remained high among men, despite substantial problems with erectile dysfunction. 2

Erectile dysfunction

It is important to understand that dysfunction is not an inevitable aspect of getting older. In fact, it’s more of a side effect of lifestyle than aging.

My initial advice to a man wanting to preserve or restore his sexual function is, instead of drugs, tie on your running shoes and start walking or jogging and change your nutrition. The old adage, “You are what you eat” rings true for sexual health and performance. Nutrition and exercise control the entire physiology of your body, and what you eat and do reflects in your ability to perform in bed.

Aging Men, Obesity, Metabolic Syndrome, Decrease in Total Serum Testosterone Levels
Researchers writing in the Journal of Urology say that their study “…demonstrated that aging men with obesity and the metabolic syndrome have a significant decrease in total serum testosterone levels compared to aging, metabolically healthy men.” Read more

Decreased Testosterone and Erectile Dysfunction
Researchers writing in the Journal of Urology say that their study clearly demonstrated a decrease in testosterone level throughout a 4-year follow up in patients with ED. Read more

Diabetes and ED
Researchers writing in the British Journal of Urology say that about 1 in 3 men newly diagnosed with diabetes had ED. Read more

Is Erectile Dysfunction A Marker For Diabetes?
Researchers writing in the Journal of Urology say that male dysfunction was “an observable marker of diabetes mellitus, strongly so for men 45 years old or younger and likely for men 46 to 65 years old, but it is not a marker for men older than 66 years.” Read more

1. Mäkinen JI, Perheentupa A, Raitakari OT, et al. Sexual symptoms in aging men indicate poor life satisfaction and increased health service consumption Urology. 2007 Dec;70(6):1194-9.

2. Smith LJ, Mulhall JP, Deveci S, Monaghan N, Reid MC. Sex after seventy: a pilot study of sexual function in older persons. J Sex Med. 2007 Sep;4(5):1247-53.

What causes muscle loss in men?

October 19, 2013 by  
Filed under Exercise

What causes muscle loss in men? If you have obesity and diabetes, you have known risk factors for the development of physical disability. This includes loss of muscle.

A major problem we see in our practice in aging men in is sarcopenia, the progressive loss of muscle mass and strength. Researchers have put together a good amount of evidence to link obesity and diabetes as factors that will accelerate  the progression of sarcopenia, and subsequently functional decline in older adults. 1

In other research not only was obesity and diabetes cited as culprits of muscle loss but back pain as well as it prevented exercise necessary to maintain and build muscle.  2

Worse is the connection that obesity and low back pain can also lead to problems of bone mineral density. 3

These are the many factors effecting the aging male patient who wishes to maintain a musclular figure. At Darrow Sports and Wellness we can help you treat problems of muscle and bone loss not only by addressing the lifestyle changes you need but by also by addressing the problems of lower back pain.

Contact Dr. Darrow

1 Exp Gerontol. 2013 Sep;48(9):888-97. doi: 10.1016/j.exger.2013.06.007. Epub 2013 Jul 4. Obesity and diabetes as accelerators of functional decline: can lifestyle interventions maintain functional status in high risk older adults?

2 Forrest KY, Zmuda JM, Cauley JA. Patterns and determinants of muscle strength change with aging in older men. Aging Male. 2005 Sep-Dec;8(3):151-6.

3. Al-Saeed O, Mohammed A, Azizieh F, Gupta R. Evaluation of bone mineral density in patients with chronic low back pain. Asian Spine J. 2013 Jun;7(2):104-10. doi: 10.4184/asj.2013.7.2.104. Epub 2013 May 22.

Dr. Darrow expalins more about Stem Cell Therapy and back pain

Erectile Dysfunction and Diabetes

April 13, 2011 by  
Filed under Diabetes

Researchers writing in the Journal of Urology say that male dysfunction was “an observable marker of diabetes mellitus, strongly so for men 45 years old or younger and likely for men 46 to 65 years old, but it is not a marker for men older than 66 years.”

Sun P, Cameron A, Seftel A, Shabsigh R, Niederberger C, Guay A. Erectile dysfunction–an observable marker of diabetes mellitus? A large national epidemiological study.J Urol. 2006 Sep;176(3):1081-5; discussion 1085
From the study abstract
Read more

Low Estradiol Levels and Cognitive Function

April 13, 2011 by  
Filed under Cognitive Function

Researchers writing in the medical journal Neurobiology of Aging, say that “Older women with low estradiol levels were more likely to experience decline in global cognitive function and verbal memory, and a similar trend was observed for verbal memory in men.”

Yaffe K, Barnes D, Lindquist K, Cauley J, Simonsick EM, Penninx B, Satterfield S, Harris T, Cummings SR. Endogenous sex hormone levels and risk of cognitive decline in an older biracial cohort. Neurobiol Aging. 2007 Feb;28(2):171-8.
Read more

Exercise and Menopausal Symptoms

April 13, 2011 by  
Filed under Exercise, Menopause

Researchers writing in the British Journal of General Practice say that their study “suggest(s) a positive association between somatic and psychological dimensions of health-related quality of life and participation in regular exercise. Women with BMI scores in the normal range reported lower vasomotor symptom scores and better health-related quality of life scores than heavier women.”

Daley A, Macarthur C, Stokes-Lampard H, McManus R, Wilson S, Mutrie N. Exercise participation, body mass index, and health-related quality of life in women of menopausal age. Br J Gen Pract. 2007 Feb;57(535):130-5.

BACKGROUND: Menopausal symptoms can affect women’s health and wellbeing. It is important to develop interventions to alleviate symptoms, especially given recent evidence resulting in many women no longer choosing to take hormone replacement therapy. Exercise may prove useful in alleviating symptoms, although evidence on its effectiveness has been conflicting.
Read more

Aging Men, Obesity, Metabolic Syndrome, Decrease in Total Serum Testosterone Levels

April 13, 2011 by  
Filed under Testosterone - Men

Researchers writing in the Journal of Urology say that their study “…demonstrated that aging men with obesity and the metabolic syndrome have a significant decrease in total serum testosterone levels compared to aging, metabolically healthy men.”

Kaplan SA, Meehan AG, Shah A. The Age Related Decrease in Testosterone is Significantly Exacerbated in Obese Men With the Metabolic Syndrome. What are the Implications for the Relatively High Incidence of Erectile Dysfunction Observed in These Men? J Urol. 2006 Oct;176(4):1524-8
Read more

Abdominal Fat Strongest Indication of Health Risks

April 13, 2011 by  
Filed under Diet and Lifestyle

Researchers writing in the medical journal Obesity, say that waist measurement is one of the most useful indicators of health risk.

Shen W, Punyanitya M, Chen J, Gallagher D, Albu J, Pi-Sunyer X, Lewis CE, Grunfeld C, Heshka S, Heymsfield SB. Waist Circumference Correlates with Metabolic Syndrome Indicators Better Than Percentage Fat.

From the article abstract
OBJECTIVE: Percent fat is often considered the reference for establishing the magnitude of adipose tissue accumulation and the risk of excess adiposity. However, the increasing recognition of a strong link between central adiposity and metabolic disturbances led us to test whether waist circumference (WC) is more highly correlated with metabolic syndrome components than percent fat and other related anthropometric measures such as BMI. (Body Mass Index)

Waist circumference had the strongest associations with health risk indicators, followed by BMI. Although percent fat is a useful measure of overall adiposity, health risks are best represented by the simply measured WC.

Obesity and Decreased Hormone Production

April 12, 2011 by  
Filed under Diet and Lifestyle

Researchers writing in the medical journal Clinical Endocrinology say that “Obesity may predict greater decline in testosterone and SHBG levels with age.”

Derby CA, Zilber S, Brambilla D, Morales KH, McKinlay JB. Body mass index, waist circumference and waist to hip ratio and change in sex steroid hormones: the Massachusetts Male Ageing Study. Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 2006 Jul 1;65(1):125-31.

From the study abstract:
Objective Cross-sectional data suggest that obesity, particularly central obesity, may be associated with decreased production of sex steroid hormones in men. However, longitudinal hormone data on men in relation to obesity status are limited. Previous studies have not consistently demonstrated whether sex steroids are associated specifically to body mass index or to measures of central obesity.

Our objective was to examine the relation of obesity and of central obesity to longitudinal change in sex steroid hormones in men.

Measurements Free and total testosterone (FT and TT), dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS), and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) were assessed using standardized methods. Health behaviours and medical history were obtained by structured interview.

Repeated measures regression was used to describe trends in steroid hormones and SHBG in relation to obesity status, adjusting for age, smoking, alcohol, comorbidities, and physical activity.

Results: Obesity was associated with decreased levels of total and free testosterone, and of SHBG at follow-up relative to baseline. For any given baseline concentration of TT, FT or SHBG, follow-up levels were lowest among men who remained obese or who became obese during follow-up.

This was true for all three indices of obesity. Central adiposity was associated with lower DHEAS levels at follow-up, while elevated body mass index was not.

Conclusions: Obesity may predict greater decline in testosterone and SHBG levels with age. Central adiposity may be a more important predictor of decline in DHEAS than is body mass index.

Be Active: Reduce Diabetes Risk, Live Longer

April 12, 2011 by  
Filed under Diabetes

Jonker JT,De Laet C,Franco OH, Peeters A, Mackenbach J, Nusselder WJ. Physical Activity and Life Expectancy With and Without Diabetes. Diabetes Care 29:38-43, 2006

Researchers writing in the medical journal Diabetes Care, examined the relationship between active lifestyle, diabetes, and life expectancy. From the abstract:

OBJECTIVE—Physical activity is associated with a reduced risk of developing diabetes and with reduced mortality among diabetic patients. However, the effects of physical activity on the number of years lived with and without diabetes are unclear. Our aim is to calculate the differences in life expectancy with and without type 2 diabetes associated with different levels of physical activity.

CONCLUSIONS—Moderately and highly active people have a longer total life expectancy and live more years free of diabetes than their sedentary counterparts but do not spend more years with diabetes.

Read the abstract

Low Gylcemic Index Foods for Weight Loss and Diabetes

April 12, 2011 by  
Filed under Diet and Lifestyle

Researchers writing in The Diabetes Educator say that incorporating more low-glycemic foods helped individuals with weight control and diabetes.

From the abstract:
PURPOSE: This retrospective study evaluated the incorporation of low-glycemic index (GI) carbohydrates into daily meal planning as an effective behavioral lifestyle change to improve glycemic control and weight management in patients with type 1 and 2 diabetes.

CONCLUSIONS: Daily incorporation of low-GI carbohydrates in meal planning can be an effective diabetes self-management strategy for glycemic control and weight management. The documented responses to the subjects’ conceptual and practical knowledge of the GI confirm their acceptance of this approach as a permanent behavioral lifestyle change and not a “diet.” The positive results of this study attest to what worked for these subjects, inviting diabetes educators to consider offering low-GI dietary advice to their diabetes patients.”

Read the abstract
Burani J, Longo PJ. Low–Glycemic Index Carbohydrates. An Effective Behavioral Change for Glycemic Control and Weight Management in Patients With Type 1 and 2 Diabetes. The Diabetes Educator, Vol. 32, No. 1, 78-88 (2006)

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Prolotherapy, PRP, AGE MANAGEMENT MEDICINE, and other modalities mentioned are medical techniques that may not be considered mainstream. As with any medical TREATMENT, results will vary among individuals, and there is no implication that you will HEAL OR receive the same outcome as patients herein. there could be pain or substantial risks involved. These concerns should be discussed with your health care provider prior to any treatment so that you have proper informed consent and understand that there are no guarantees to healing.
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